It’s Good To Have A Dictionary To Divine The Meaning Of Words

But it doesn’t always help.
I’m still struggling with the question of bird-divination at Ugarit. Let me be clear. On one hand, there isn’t any obvious evidence for bird-divination at Ugarit. On the other hand, there is lots of evidence for divination, specifically Mesopotamian style divination of which bird divination was a part, at Ugarit. KTU 1.140 is in the tradition of Šumma izbu (dealing with birth defects) and KTU 1.141-144 and 1.155 are in the tradition of Šumma immer (dealing with extispicy) and then there are those inscribed liver and lung models.
Several years ago van Soldt’s argued, successfully I think, that ˀAttānu, the teacher of the great scribe ˀIli-malku, was a diviner/seer, a purulinu/i to be exact. The Ugaritic reads prln (KTU 1.6 VI:55). Van Soldt’s argument is based, in part, on a reconstruction of a fragment of an excerpt (yes, a fragment of an excerpt) of something like the four column vocabulary text from Ugarit. For those keeping score at home, the fragment, actually two joined fragments, is RS 20:189A+B. Based on the remains of this excerpt, a comparable one from Emar and several other considerations, van Soldt reads the Sumerian, Akkadian, Hurrian and Ugaritic columns of RS 20:189A+B:33,
[ḪUL      ba-ru-]ú      pu-ru-li-ni      pu-r[u-li-nu/i]
(Actually, this is my reconstruction of van Soldt’s reconstruction. If you read his paper, you’ll understand)
The argument is much stronger than this reconstruction alone might suggest. Among other things, the Emar text rather clearly reads ḪUL ba-ru-u in its only two columns. Ugaritic prln then appears to be a loanword from Hurrian meaning about the same things as Akkadian bārȗ, a diviner in general. But the Akkadian term is very often used in association with extispicy.
So, was ˀAttānu a bird-diviner? There is no way of telling and I think it more likely that he was an extispicist, if he had a specialty at all.
Reference:

van Soldt, W.H., “ˀAtn prln, ‘ˀAttånu the Diviner.’” UF 21 (1989) 365–68.