Sometimes A Chariot Is Just A Chariot

In his abnormally helpful Lexicon Companion (I write in shorthand), Tawil, 224, notes that Hebrew מֶרְכָּבָה and Akkadian narkabtu are cognates. Of the several examples he provides to show parallel usage, I found two abnormally interesting.
First he notes Micah 1:13 and Genesis 46:29 where we are told that someone “hitched” his chariot and compares these usages with Akkadian narkablta ṣamādu, citing specifically šumma rubū narkabta iṣmid-ma, “If a prince hitches his chariot and.” While Tawil references CAD N(1), 355a, the source is CT 40 35-37(K. 3836+7211 +) obv.:30. The Akkadian is an omen whose complete text reads:
DIŠ NUN GIŠ.GIGIR LÁ-ma ina KASKAL TA GIŠ.GIGIR ana IGI ANŠE.KUR.RA ŠUB-ut / šá NUN BI U4.MEŠ-šú GUDx.LAGAB.DA.MEŠ BE-ma KI.ŠÚ dan-na IGI.DU8
šumma rubū narkabta iṣmid-ma ina ḫarrāni ištu narkabti ana pān sīsî imqut ša rubî šuāti ūmīšu kurīti šumma kīla danna immar
If a prince harnesses a chariot and on the road he falls from the chariot in front of the horses, for that prince, his days will be short when he experiences harsh imprisonment.
As far as I can tell and I tend to look for such things, neither Genesis 46:29 nor Micah 1:13 reflect Mesopotamian divination traditions. Not that Tawil claims they do.
Second, Tawil notes 2 Kings 5:21, וַיִּפֹּל מֵעַל הַמֶּרְכָּבָה, “and he (Naaman) “fell’ from the chariot.” Here, Tawil cites another phrase form the same Akkadian omen, ina ḫarrāni ištu narkabti ana pān sīsî imqut, “(and) on the road falls from the chariot in front of the horses.” While the surrounding context involves prophetic activity, it’s not clear that anything in or around 2 Kings 5:21 relates to divination as seen in this omen. One might wonder at the choice of the Hebrew verb נָפַל, “fall, lie.” But “alight” is well within the semantic range of נָפַל. So I think it wrong to make too much (anything) of this.
I think Tawil’s suggestions are instructive as long as one doesn’t make too much of them. While I tried and failed to make more of them that they could bear, Tawil doesn’t seem to. Sometimes a chariot is just a chariot.
Reference:

Tawil, Hayim ben Yosef, An Akkadian Lexical Companion For Biblical Hebrew: Etymological-Semantic and Idiomatic Equivalents with Supplement on Biblical Aramaic (Jersey City, NJ: KTAV, 2009), 243-244.